Thursday, 6 November 2008

Mike Liston - Renewables Revolution NOT

Mike Liston was recently interviewed by the JEP about the feasibility of developing renewable energies (wind, solar, marine) in Jersey. http://www.thisisjersey.com/2008/10/25/marine-energy-usable-in-15-years/

In their article he is said to be the chairman of the Renewable Energy Group Ltd. He is not. He is actually the non-executive chairman of Renewable Energy Generation Ltd.

He says that "The economics to make the scheme work (renewables such as marine) will prevent them from being a reality in Jersey for another 15 years"

Whether a renewables scheme could work in Jersey, I suggest has a lot more to do with will rather than means.

Samso Island near Denmark is totally energy self sufficient. The islanders own their means of energy production and can even sell the surplus to the mainland. They can profit from their wind turbines 6 to 7 years after construction. They started 10 years ago with a couple of turbines and a district heating plant. Why can't Jersey do the same? At least as a pilot project.

Their energy supports a population of about 4,500 people, which increases 10 fold each summer with tourists. The cost so far - about £40million (less than one tenth of our strategic reserve).

If we get some green candidates elected, will they propose at least a pilot renewables project?

3 comments:

Nick Palmer said...

Yes, but I'm not completely committing myself to what type or when yet

Captain Fantastic said...

The States officially opposed plans for an adjacent offshore wind farm in French waters.

Constable Murphy is a known critic of wind power so I question why he is on a panel that suggests spending half a million on looking into the feasibility of tidal energy, this has been done before, and we all know the technology is there, surely we would be better off investing our money in wind and solar power, perhaps States buildings could lead by example.

ratleskutle said...

I wonder if Jersey will get renewable energy when almost everyone else has done? The States are not exactly innovative. I would describe us as laggards. Any States panel examining renewable energy will probably only go that far: examining.